Ceramic fibers, aluminum silicate fibers, polycrystalline mullite, and alumina fibers are very similar, and many industry insiders cannot understand the differences and differences between them because they only know the products they make.
Ceramic fiber is a general term for polycrystalline mullite, alumina fiber, and aluminum silicate fiber. It is called ceramic fiber because it is a ceramic material category of inorganic non-metallic materials.
Mullite, aluminum silicate, and aluminum oxide are all aluminum silicon refractory materials, but the content of AL2O3 and the main solid phase composition vary depending on their nomenclature. The main crystalline phase is aluminum silicate (AL2O3 content is around 30-69%), which is called aluminum silicate fiber. Fibers with mullite as the main crystalline phase (AL2O3 content is around 69-75%) are called mullite fibers. Fibers with alumina as the main crystalline phase (AL2O3 content above 90%) are called alumina fibers.
These fibers are made into cotton like fibers by melting their respective solid minerals and using methods such as blowing and spinning. These cotton like fibers can be needled and woven into ceramic fiber blankets, and then wet compressed and dried with a binder to produce ceramic fiber paper, ceramic fiber board, etc.
From the perspective of temperature resistance, aluminum silicate fiber has a temperature resistance of 1260~1450 ℃, polycrystalline mullite has a temperature resistance of 1600 ℃, and alumina fiber has a temperature resistance of 1700~1800 ℃. However, from the current market perspective, the range of use of aluminum silicate fiber products is relatively high. Firstly, most industries do not exceed a high temperature of 1500 ℃, secondly, the high cost of polycrystalline mullite and alumina fiber, and thirdly, due to immature technology, The corresponding products of polycrystalline mullite and alumina fibers are relatively few and cannot meet the usage requirements, so aluminum silicate fiber products are more suitable for the current industrial environment.

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Ceramic fibers, aluminum silicate fibers, polycrystalline mullite fibers, and alumina fibers are very similar, what are the differences?
Ceramic fiber is a general term for polycrystalline mullite, alumina fiber, and aluminum silicate fiber, and is called ceramic fiber because it is a ceramic material category of inorganic non-metallic materials.
Aluminum silicate, mullite, and alumina all belong to the aluminum silicon refractory system, but the content of AL2O3 and the content of the main solid phase composition vary depending on the nomenclature. The main crystalline phase is aluminum silicate (AL2O3 content is around 30-69%), which is called aluminum silicate fiber. The main crystalline phase is mullite (with AL2O3 content of around 69-75%), which is called mullite fiber. The main crystalline phase is alumina (with an AL2O3 content of over 90%), which is called alumina fiber.
These fibers are made into cotton like fibers by melting their respective solid minerals and using methods such as blowing and spinning. These cotton like fibers can be needled and woven into ceramic fiber blankets, and then wet compressed and dried with a binder to produce ceramic fiber paper, ceramic fiber board, etc.
From the perspective of temperature resistance, aluminum silicate fiber has a temperature resistance of 1050~1430 ℃, polycrystalline mullite has a temperature resistance of 1600 ℃, and alumina fiber has a temperature resistance of 1700~1800 ℃. However, from the current market perspective, the range of use of aluminum silicate fiber products is relatively high. Most industries do not experience temperatures exceeding 1500 degrees Celsius, followed by high costs of polycrystalline mullite and alumina fibers.